Zines

Nearly thirty years into its existence, 8-Track Mind still manages a weirdness few other zines have. Loosely dedicated to an obsession with 8-track tapes, in issue 104, the "Cartridge Family" ostensibly work under the theme of "the commodification of nostalgia" and let whatever happens happen. 

Within: a series of oddball fables, 8-track Terminator, a Muskegon Eight-Track story, So Wrong They're Right, the scam of 8-track eBay, and so much more...[ continued ]

JB
Antonia $5.00

A rare, almost-sublime zine about place, memory, and lost history. About the ways things change and stay the same. About how the place you're from shapes who you become. About growing up in a small Midwestern town without a zip code, a place not on most maps. 

As JB writes in the introduction: "I never read about or saw anything that looked like where I grew up. I was always on the lookout, but depictions of rural areas I encountered didn't feel familiar, seemed to picture a world that was too remote, too friendly, too simple, too impoverished, too sinister, or too romantic...[ continued ]

A zine in tribute to a maligned beauty of pop culture's past: the compact cassette tape. Twenty writers, musicians, DJs, label owners, publishers, and comic artists tell stories of how cassette tapes have affected their lives, for better or worse. 

Within: the art of the mixtape, the importance of the boombox, the intimacy of the Walkman. Plus tales of recording with cassettes, performing with cassettes, releasing cassettes, falling in love with cassettes...[ continued ]

In this issue of Brainscan, Alex Wrekk (Stolen Sharpie Revolution) discusses the individualized witchcraft practice she's pieced together over the past decade. While documenting her journey, she looks at a variety of other witchcraft traditions, why they didn't fully work for her, and why secular witchcraft is just as valid as any other form. She also gives plenty of history and context to help understand terms that often get lumped together (Wicca, Pagan, etc), and critiques the cultural appropriation and consumerism that often arise in modern witchcraft manifestations...[ continued ]

Long-time zinester Liz Mason and her husband Joe Mason take on the subject of secret societies ("Masons on Masons.") Highly informative and incredibly cheeky histories of the Masons, the Illuminati, and more.

48 pages, half-letter size.

An adorable little zine about a some great cats of history. Cats immortalized in poems, cats who braved trans-Antarctic explorations, cats famous for watching cricket. A perfect gift for any literary cat lover.

16 pages, cut quarter-size. Cover colors vary.

Farm & Wilderness Report Zine #1 focuses on the entwined histories of Total Loss Farm and Montague Farm as part of a deep dive into the communal farm movement and underground press movement of the 1960s and early '70s.

This zine revises and combines the information from the first and second Farm & Wilderness Report zines, while also kicking off a new zine series...[ continued ]

A history of pre-Roe v Wade America, underground abortion services, and the pro-choice movement. Packed with stories of incredible women who took matters into their own hands.

24 pages, A5 size.

The second issue of the excellent movies of the 1930s zine, A Great and Terrible Golden Age. Within: a Joan Crawford rich person solo sport montage, Soviet sci-fi, the pompous genius of "the fifth Marx Brother" Margaret Dumont, Greta Garbo's only rom-com, and Ernst Lubitsch galore!

Contributions from Emily Alden Foster, Bethany Simard, Yvonne Li, Emily Parrish, Lindsey Simard, Robert Dynamite, Tessa Brunton, and Joshua James Amberson...[ continued ]

An entire issue of A Great and Terrible Golden Age dedicated to the one-and-only Claudette Colbert. Essays and comics about her controversial (and motion picture industry-altering) boobs in Cecil B. DeMille's 1932 film The Sign of the Cross and her year of ruling Hollywood (1934) when she made It Happened One Night, Cleopatra, Four Frightened People, and Imitation of Life...[ continued ]