Zines

Jennifer Williams' workbook zine, The Actual Feeling: Discussion Questions to Name Emotions and Ask for the Support You Need, helps lead readers to the core of their emotional needs. Created out of workshops she led in the wake of the Ghost Ship tragedy and the 2016 election, The Actual Feeling asks its readers to define words in tangible ways in order to better communicate needs and better support others...[ continued ]

In All Together, Emma Percy asks us to think about our relationship with community, place, plants, climate, food, and land. They ask us to consider how we relate (consciously or unconsciously) with the watershed and ecosystem we live in, and helps us figure out how we can know the place we live more intimately. 

"It may be too late to undo climate change, but we can still build a future worth living in," Emma writes...[ continued ]

JB
Antonia $5.00

A rare, almost-sublime zine about place, memory, and lost history. About the ways things change and stay the same. About how the place you're from shapes who you become. About growing up in a small Midwestern town without a zip code, a place not on most maps. 

As JB writes in the introduction: "I never read about or saw anything that looked like where I grew up. I was always on the lookout, but depictions of rural areas I encountered didn't feel familiar, seemed to picture a world that was too remote, too friendly, too simple, too impoverished, too sinister, or too romantic...[ continued ]

The best zine about zines around. Within: Sarah Mirk's joy-inducing stories about her Year of Zines project. Corinne Halbert's "Zany Zinetiquette" comics. Gianni Simone's stories of how his early 2000s zines led to becoming a freelance writer in Japan. Ed Kemp and Mark Cunning's home copier treatises. Todd Taylor's personal history of Razorcake frugality. Liz Mason's hilarious Quimby's "Zine Data Mining...[ continued ]

Behind the Zines is a zine about zines. Think of it as a small-scale Broken Pencil or Xerography Debt, a biannual publication that puts a spotlight on what's going on in the zine community. In this issue: scene reports, zine fest travels, zine spreadsheets, zine reluctance, and zine reviews. It asks how personal is too personal, and includes an interview with Kara Comegys of the zine Clumsy, discussing zines, sexual assault, and using art to heal...[ continued ]

Our favorite zine about zines. And there's just so much good. Kate Foray and Dan Nelson discuss the upswing in wrestling zines. Frederick Moe dives into amateur press associations. Jess Hogan tells the nontraditional story of Neither/Nor Distro and how it can work in other places. Plus words, interviews, and features from some of our faves: Anna Jo Beck, Julia Eff, Kari Tervo, Saeko Reed, and so many more...[ continued ]

The latest issue of newest best zine about zines around. Within: the evolution of DIY comics culture, zine-fest history, imagined zines, One Punk's Guide to collaborative zines, a history of that one Crimethinc poster, The Most Unwanted Zine, confessions of a sex-zine zinester, an interview with the Dear Diary Zine Fest, and more.

Pieces from some of our favorite folks: our very own Gina Sarti (Shit's Fucked, Drivel), John Porcellino (King Cat), Todd Taylor (Razorcake), Liz Mason (Caboose), Ed Kemp (I Fucking Love This Album), Frederick Moe (Tin Can Telephone), and many many more...[ continued ]

Addicting and perfectly bizarre, Cometbus #58 is a story about finding home in a greasy-spoon diner full of combative old-timers. It's a ride full of strangeness and surprises.

44 pages, half-letter size.

[ continued ]

How does Cometbus, after 38 years as a zine, just get better and better? It's a mystery, but it does. Issue 59 is a deep dive into both death and longevity in the underground. In short: what does sustainability look like in counterculture? This question takes Aaron on a journey from the Epitaph Records and Thrasher magazine offices to hanging out at a punk-owned vegan donut shop and a tamale stand at the farmer's market with Allison Wolfe (of Bratmobile and Sex Stains fame)...[ continued ]

Farm & Wilderness Report Zine #1 focuses on the entwined histories of Total Loss Farm and Montague Farm as part of a deep dive into the communal farm movement and underground press movement of the 1960s and early '70s.

This zine revises and combines the information from the first and second Farm & Wilderness Report zines, while also kicking off a new zine series...[ continued ]